Tag Archives: Brugse

#105 – Duchesse de Bourgogne

#105 - Duchesse de Bourgogne

Size: 250 ml

ABV: 6.2 %

My third beer of the night, and something of a switch after two heavy tripels. I had heard a lot about the Duchess of Burgundy, and was served this one up by Andrew in its rightful glass. I had only possibly drunk two Belgian beers loosely named after a woman. One was a statue in a Park in Ostend (#43), and the other was a witch (#79). Surely here was a proper Belgian heroine?

Before my infatuation with Belgium I would often struggle to be able to name many famous Belgians, let alone a female one. I’m still trying to think of one now. Even TinTin and Asterix were completely male orientated! Ask any Belgian however, and many will point to the good Duchesse – and with good reason.

Mary of Burgundy was born at the Castle of Coudenburg in Brussels in 1457, to be the only child of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy and his wife Isabella of Bourbon. She was instantly the heiress to a vast swathe of Burgundian land stretching from the Low Countries deep into France. She instantly became a hit with the fellas, even at the age of five when her hand was sought for the future Ferdinand II of Aragon. Later suitors included King Louis XI of France on behalf of his son, the Dauphin Charles. Mary managed to hold off the attention, although things came to a bit of a head in 1477 when her father infamously died at the Siege of Nancy. France suddenly saw an opportunity to secure the inheritance of the Low Countries through the union with the 19 year old Mary.

It is perhaps fair to say that the Duchesse de Bourgogne is so popular in the modern era due to her snubbing of the French. Later that year, she opted to take the hand of Archduke Maximilian* of Austria, aligning herself to the Hapsburgs and changing the fate of history for the Low Countries. What followed was about two hundred years of relative peace. The French were spurned, and civil strife was abated. It wasn’t something however that Mary could spend her later years looking back on fondly. Tragically just five years after marrying Maximilian she was thrown from her horse while falconing and trampled. It was to break her back and she survived no more than a few days. The artwork on the label is a famous Flemish portrait of Mary and her falcon photographed by Hugo Maertens.

The beer itself is a Flanders sour red ale with plenty of bite, which gets its unique flavour through a primary and secondary fermentation, followed by eighteen long months maturation in oak. The final mix is then blended with a younger eight month beer. Its well worth the wait, but like anything in 250 ml bottles its over in the shake of a lambs tail.

* You may remember Maximilian from drinking Brugse Zot (#36) – he suggested that the people of Bruges were all mad fools !

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Filed under 8, Sour Ale, Verhaeghe

#36 – Brugse Zot

#36 - Brugse Zot

Size: 330 ml

ABV: 6 %

The beer Brugse Zot is actually a slight against the people of Bruges. The jester or fool on the label is meant to represent the people of this elegant, quaint tourist haven. This isn’t just a wild accusation of widespread idiocy by the brewers, but actually a legend that stems from the colourful history of the town.

The modern day country of Belgium was once part of the wider Netherlands, which was also a part of the enormous realm of the Holy Roman Empire. For sixty years from 1459, Maximilian ruled the Empire, and did much to protect the lowlands from French rule as a way of defending his first wifes inheritance (Duchesse de Bourgogne, #105). Many Belgians were extremely fond of the emperor for his attempts to stabilise the area, and none more so than the people of Bruges who welcomed him on a visit to the town with a colourful parade of merrymakers. At the end of the visit, local dignitaries asked the emperor if he would be so kind as to provide hard cash for a new lunatic asylum in the town. Maximilian responded with the immortal lines ‘Madmen? Lunatics? Since I got here I’ve seen nothing but lunatics – Bruges is a madhouse!”. The nickname for the people ‘Brugse Zotten’ stemmed from this day.

It is unclear in what context Maximilian made his reference, although it should be pointed out that the burghers of Bruges once held Maximilian hostage for several months in an attempt to raise a ransom. Whether this was before or after Maximilians remarks would largely go someway to defining just how foolish the people of Bruges actually were.

The beer itself is the flagship beer of the town of Bruges, brewed by the De Halve Maan brewery. It had a nice pale colour on pouring with a frothy white head. It looked a bit lagery on first glimpse yet the aroma was polished with a really fruity bouquet. The first swig was though quite mild in comparison, with a pale flavour that threatened to explode at times but remained firmly in the anonymous camp. The odd hint of daring citrus just wasn’t enough to turn this beer into anything but an average Belgian blonde. I’d certainly be a fool to buy a crate of this !

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Filed under 6, Belgian Ale, de Halve Maan